Monday
May022016

JES Tech Crawfish Boil

Snap! Crackle! Pop!  Those are the sounds heard all around during the JES Tech Crawfish Boil!  We had an excellent turn out …although we did miss you if you were not able to make it.

For those who don’t eat crawfish, it is always a spectacle to sit back and witness all the popping and cracking for such a tiny piece of protein!  And can we talk about how serious people are about eating crawfish? Some arrived in their “crawfish clothes” so they could chow down without any hesitation. Several reminisced about their personal homemade crawfish dipping concoctions that they almost brought with them. Some stacked their eaten crawfish so nice and neat like they were going to tuck them in for a good night’s sleep. Let’s just say there is quite a commitment to crawfish!  Apparently everything was worth all the work and effort because the verdict was received…the crawfish were DELICIOUS

Even if you aren’t a crawfish eater, we had tasty and flavorful sausage, potatoes, and corn—and if you weren’t into that either, there was pizza!  We received overpoweringly positive comments declaring that all the food was great. On top of that, the weather was absolutely beautiful, with a cool breeze flowing. It made the conversation and laughter even that much more enjoyable. There was even some dancing to the lively music in the background. Not naming any names but…Nancy…Chris…Diane…Dallas… J

Feedback also confirmed that the timing of the event made attending easier. By holding the event over a few hours in the evening, people were able to come grab a to-go plate before their daily commute or before picking up kids. People were able to join the event when time permitted after leaving work, or meet up with guests at the event with no pressure on time. We had a steady flow of people coming and going throughout the evening. With the atmosphere so enjoyable, people stayed until we concluded the event at 7 p.m. Everyone left full and satisfied!

It was pleasure taking time away from work to enjoy each other’s company. We thank you for coming out and giving us the opportunity to share time with your family and friends! 

PS:  Don’t miss the next event!

Monday
May022016

Habitat House Event

One of our JES Tech family members, Cruz T., who supports the Human Health Performance Contract, had a great experience participating in the Wyle Community Service Team’s Habitat for Humanity House project. Thanks for sharing Cruz!

About 14 people (Wyle employees, team members, and family) showed up in La Porte, Saturday, April 9 to build a house for Cynthia and her 6 daughters. Our job that day was to put in the floor joists and anchor the base, something Cynthia said would be very important given the number of cheerleaders she is going to have in the house. It was great to have her there, cheering us along and thanking us as we worked to build her a home. I may have been sore that evening, but I appreciate the opportunity to participate in this Habitat for Humanity event. Until next time!

 

Thursday
Apr072016

JES Tech Team Supporting the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) on KHOU News Featuring “NASA Recruiting More Women for the Future”

JES Tech has a team of 17 people supporting JSC’s Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA), formerly known as the Deep Space Habitat. Our support is part of the JSC Human Health and Performance Contract (HHPC). Scientists use the HERA to conduct research to address the risks related to human performance during spaceflight. Our Flight Analogs Project Operations team monitors activities for HERA missions and facilitates communication for the HERA crew regarding science and operations activities.

JES Tech employees Joyce Schulz and Barbara Miller are included in the footage. Take a look at the video at: 

http://legacy.khou.com/story/news/local/2016/02/29/nasa-recruiting-more-women-future/81100086/

Tuesday
Apr212015

Control Your Emotions in Volatile Markets

For the past few years, the stock market has moved up fairly steadily, with no major “corrections.” But thus far in 2015, we’ve already seen periods of volatility — enough, in fact, to make some investors jittery. Nervous investors may be more prone to make decisions based on short-term market movements — so how can you stay calm?

First of all, when evaluating your investment decisions, stay focused on those factors that have historically driven stock prices. The U.S. economy is growing at a reasonably good pace, and corporate earnings remain fairly strong. Plus, stocks may not be as undervalued as they were a few years ago — as measured by the price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) — but they still aren’t overly expensive, either. Things can change, of course, but when market volatility seems to be primarily caused by short-term events, such as plunging oil prices, it’s important to look beyond the headlines to these less glamorous, but probably more important, fundamentals of good investing. By doing so, you can help avoid making fear-driven investment choices.

What else can you do to help ensure that you don’t let feelings of anxiety influence your investment moves? For one thing, evaluate your investment mix. If you own too many stocks and stock-based vehicles, you could take a big hit if stock prices fall sharply during periods of volatility. Historically, however, bond prices have typically increased when stock prices fell — although, of course, there are no guarantees. So, if your portfolio consists of stocks and bonds, you are better positioned to weather the harshest effects of market turbulence.

To further prepare yourself for downturns, you may also want to diversify your fixed-income holdings to include investments such as U.S. Treasury bills, certificates of deposit (CDs) and municipal bonds. The percentages of each type of investment within your portfolio should be based on your goals, risk tolerance and time horizon.

Finally, you can help yourself maintain an even-keeled approach to investing by always looking for quality. Typically, higher quality investments fare better during market declines and recover more quickly when the markets rebound. How can you judge whether a particular investment is of good “quality“? A long-term track record is useful to study. It’s certainly true that, as you have no doubt heard, “past performance is no guarantee of future results,” but it’s nonetheless valuable to know how a particular stock, for example, has performed in various economic environments. If it seems to have done well relative to others in its industry and over long periods of time, that may give you a good idea of its quality.

It’s never easy to take all the emotions out of investing, especially during periods of market volatility. After all, you count on your investments to help provide you with the type of future you’ve envisioned. But by focusing on the fundamentals, putting together an appropriate investment mix and constantly looking for quality, you can help “de-stress” yourself — and, as the American poet, novelist and historian J.G. Holland once said, “Calmness is the cradle of power.” 

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

 

Garrett T. Maddox, CRPC®

1020 Bay Area Blvd, Suite 106

Houston, TX 77058

Telephone 281-280-0534

garrett.maddox@edwardjones.com

Monday
Aug182014

Are You a Baby Boomer? Don't Let Retirement Plans Go Bust


If you’re a baby boomer, you’re at the point in life where, if you haven’t actually entered retirement, you’re at least approaching the outskirts. But if you’re like many of your fellow boomers, you may be experiencing more than a little trepidation over your financial prospects as a retiree. That’s why it’s so important for you to determine what steps to take to help improve your chances of enjoying a comfortable retirement.

Just how worried are baby boomers about their future? Consider these numbers: Seventy-two percent of non-retired boomers think they will probably be forced to delay retirement, and 50% have little confidence that they will ever be able to retire, according to a recent AARP survey. Other surveys show a similarly bleak outlook among the baby boom generation.

Fortunately, when it comes to building resources for retirement, you have options. Of course, if you’re in one of the younger age cohorts of the baby boom generation, your possibilities are greater — you may still have time to take measures such as boosting your 401(k) and IRA contributions, reducing your debts and positioning your portfolio to provide you with a reasonable amount of growth potential.

But even if you are pretty close to retirement, or at least close to the point where you initially expected to retire, you can act to better your outcome. For one thing, you could re-evaluate your planned date of retirement. If you really don’t mind your job and could extend your working life for even a couple of years, you could help yourself enormously in at least three ways:

  • You’ll add on to your retirement accounts. The longer you work, the more you can contribute to your IRA and your 401(k) or other employers-sponsored account.
  • You may be able to delay taking Social Security. You can start taking Social Security as early as age 62, but your benefits will be permanently reduced unless you wait until your Full Retirement Age (FRA), which will likely be 66 or 67. Your payments can increase if you delay taking your benefits beyond your Full Retirement Age, up to age 70.
  • You may be able to delay tapping into your retirement vehicles. The longer you wait until you begin withdrawals from your IRA and 401(k), the more time you are giving these accounts to potentially grow. (Once you turn 70 ½, you will need to generally start taking withdrawals from a traditional IRA and a 401(k) or similar plan, but you don’t face this requirement with a Roth 401(k) account.)

As an alternative to delaying your retirement — or possibly as an additional step you can take along with a delay — you may be able to adjust your investment mix to provide you with the combination of growth and income that can help carry you through your retirement years. You can also be strategic about which investments you start taking withdrawals from, possibly allowing your portfolio to grow more than you had envisioned.

Start thinking now about ways you can help yourself achieve the retirement lifestyle you’ve pictured. You may want to consult with a professional financial advisor who can suggest the strategies and techniques most appropriate for your situation. In any case, with some careful planning, you can be a boomer whose retirement plans don’t go bust.

 

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

1020 Bay Area Blvd, Suite 106

Garrett T. Maddox, CRPC®

1020 Bay Area Blvd, Suite 106

Houston, TX 77058

Telephone 281-280-0534

garrett.maddox@edwardjones.com